bullying

Bowls, Bunnies, and Bullies

My rabbit, the house kind that just hops around all the time and doesn’t even have a cage to call his own, seemingly doesn’t like his food in a bowl.  We put it in a little plastic dish intended for a small animal and he dumps it in a heap then grabs his bowl and throws it across the floor.  I have been known to sweep that food up and put it back into his bowl, only to have him repeat the spilling and throwing again when he wants to eat.  I believe it’s easier to find the tastiest little pieces when it is all spilled out on the floor, and it’s a more natural form of grazing.  It’s the way God created rabbits, to snuffle over the ground and find the tasty bits to munch on.  The confined walls of his bowl only frustrate this behavior because they don’t allow the searching.

This little seemingly insignificant behavior led me to think of my son, my all-spilled-out boy.  That’s what he is….he doesn’t hide much of himself and you can’t really find his “place” in the house because his stuff is everywhere.  He just drops stuff all over as he moves through the house.  If I didn’t insist that he pick up all those things and put them in the proper places we would be searching through all the piles for the pieces that are needed or wanted.   He bares himself naked all through his day-the naked raw emotions of the entire spectrum.  He sprawls and drapes himself where ever he settles.  He is physically, mentally, and emotionally all-spilled-out.  Does he need a container? Probably, but only to help him find what he needs, to label his mental and emotional states, and then move on to the next spilling out.  It’s like the rabbits bowl, he needs that bowl in order to find where his food is placed, because unlike a dog, he really doesn’t do a very good job of finding all the little pieces and eating them.  He could be lying right next to a favorite piece of food and not really even notice unless he happened upon it by chance or it was pointed out to him, so putting it all back in his bowl brings the important things together so he knows where to find them, and so he can spill them out again.  And so it goes with the all-spilled-out boy.  He needs order and structure to bring the things together that he needs so that he can spill out again.  It’s a dance. A beautiful life-affirming necessary and sometimes frustrating dance. Continue reading